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Stories - 2014 Archives

Mother finds hope for family

"This Christmas is going to be better for my children," Shanika shares. The mother of two has struggled since losing her plant job of six years more than two years ago. "There was no family to help us. We were homeless."

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Rise Up!

More than 200 children and staff members brought Baptists to their feet with an inspirational presentation at the Annual Meeting for the Baptist State Convention.

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Brothers go from homeless to hopeful

For Thomas and Jonathan, "normal" would be the last word used to describe their lives before coming to Baptist Children's Homes. Thomas and Jonathan's parents separated, and their mother moved out of state. The boys were left solely in the care of their father and eventually, the trio were left homeless.

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Four changed by living at BCH

Joe's story is filled with chaos. Paulina's story is rooted in anger. Travis' story saw a boy helplessly watch addition consume his parents. Roberta's story is one of unimaginable cruelty. But their storylines changed through the ministry of Baptist Children's Homes of North Carolina.

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Keeping Families Strong and Alive

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Autumn never stopped hoping

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Jeremiah's focus is on the future

Like a kettle building steam over an open flame, 17-year-old Jeremiah was at a boiling point the day he ran away. He is the first to admit that he was skirting some bad situation. He says he was making some "wrong choices" and he began to have fears about his future. His family agreed that calling Baptist Children's Homes would move them in a more positive direction. The decision was made for Jeremiah to live at Kennedy Home in Kinston.

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6 Ways to Build Strong Families

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Unite set for October 18

Residents of Baptist Children’s Homes (BCH) and youth from surrounding churches came together last year for Unite, a first-year event focused on evangelism, music and fellowship. Excitement is now building for Unite 2014, which takes place on Saturday, October 18 at BCH’s Mills Home in Thomasville. Unite’s mission is to bring youth, churches and the community together for the cause of Christ. “It’s not about sameness of person, but sameness of purpose,” Jonathan Evans, Chaplain of the Dallas Cowboys and featured UNITE speaker explains. “God makes Himself evident through unity. The bible talks about the oneness of the body of Christ and the importance of every piece of the body.”

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Medlin finds lifelong home at Kennedy

The four new headstones 79-year-old Dan Medlin placed at the graves of his daddy, mother, sister Rica, and brother Higgins glistened in the sun. They were the last of the 20-plus family graves to be properly marked. Since 1943 when Medlin first came to Kennedy Home, he has always thought of the home as more of a religious place for children than an orphanage.

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Guatemalan children's home needs prayer, ready to serve children

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Children shine at Hope in Style

Eight-year-old Thomas’ eyes grow wide as he peers curiously through the window of the Greensboro Country Club. “I’ve never been to a country club before!” He and his fellow Mills Home residents wait to go inside for the third annual Hope in Style, Baptist Children’s Homes’ (BCH) children’s fashion show and silent auction. Hope in Style took place on August 9 in front of a packed room filled with friends and supporters. Lead sponsors Smart Choice and Belk, both in High Point, made it possible for 47 residents to participate.

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Powers flourishes at Kennedy Home

The white carriage ceremonially travels the newly paved road leading to historic Cedar Dell while guests, alumni and residents along the way wave and shout greetings to Captain William Lafayette Kennedy, portrayed by Kennedy Home alum and Baptist Children's Homes' (BCH) Trustee Jim Dyer, and Kennedy's wife Emily, portrayed by Kennedy Home alumna Doris Hartley Powers. The duo garbed in period clothing transpose onlookers to the time of the founding of Kennedy Home 100 years ago.

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Lilly committed to parent son

Lilly's life, as a 15 year-old teenager and as a young mother, has transformed at Care House. "When I found out I was pregnant, my mom and I had a big falling out." Finding out she was going to be a parent was a turning point in Lilly's life. And it was almost a breaking point in her relationship with her mother.. An out-of-home placement was needed to help Lilly and her mom. At three months into her pregnancy, Lilly's mom brought her to Care House in Lenoir.

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BCH launches new campaign

Baptist Children's Homes (BCH) is taking steps to ensure North Carolina children and families can count on the 128-year-old ministry well into the future. President Michael C. Blackwell announced the new Sharing Hope...Changing Lives capital campaign goal of $21,300,000.00 will provide funding for much-needed renovations, ongoing support for the residents, and building BCH's endowment.

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Rangers commit to lead others

The Rangers, the oldest group of campers at Cameron Boys Camp, aspire to set the example for all the others campers in the Frontiersmen and Trailblazer groups. Their new focus took root in January when they decided it was time to focus on each other and helping each other succeed. "We are out here to help ourselves, but the only way we can truly help ourselves is to begin helping each other.".

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Brothers together at Three Forks

R.L and Ben's parents were aged when they were born. As adults, the brothers began to lose their eyesight, eventually becoming legally blind. In 2007, R.L. and Ben were the second and third residents admitted to Three Forks Home, one of Baptist Children's Homes developmental disabilities homes in Zionville. Since living at Three Forks, both brothers have discovered a personal relationship with Jesus and continue to find ways to share His love with others.

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Sedrick taking steps forward

Sedrick was four years old when he was severely abused and neglected. A resulting brain injury not only caused developmental challenges, but it robbed him of his ability to walk. His feet turned abnormally inward, and the boy could no longer stand flat-footed. Despite his condition, Sedrick was even denied the wheelchair he needed. But now, for the first time since he was a boy, he is walking again.

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Acceptance key to achieving dreams - Being comfortable with oneself is starting place.

There is a right way to order our lives so that we are not constantly tangled and adrift but moving forward with purpose. The level of comfort we feel about ourselves plays a huge part in how we make our way in this world. It is important to remember that we are not totally mature until we can accept ourselves and know the comfort that comes from realizing we have been created intentionally for God’s glory.

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Sewing circle blesses children of Guatemala

Pullen and her Circle have sewn so many dresses that there is no need to use a pattern. The simple design of the garment makes it suitable as a dress on a young girl or a top on an older one. Pullen usually sews at her kitchen table, but sometimes the Circle takes their machines to a spare room at their church and spends the day sewing together. The women always pray for the little girls who will wear the dresses and who they will never meet.

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Lilly accepts Jesus into heart

When Lilly was five years old, she was paralyzed from the neck down in a head-on collision that killed her 25-year-old mother. Recently Lilly came to live at Baptist Children's Homes, Truett Home in Hayesville, where she has developed new friends and family. But most of all, she has discovered a new hope through a relationships with Jesus!

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Baptist Children's to Establish Orphanage in Guatemala

Baptist Children's Homes of North Carolina, Baptist Men and WMU are partnering to establish The Good Shepherd Children's Home in Xela, Guatemala. The new orphanage will provide a safe and loving home for impoverished and abandoned children of the indigenous Quiché tribe.

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Camp Duncan girls sing of new hope and healing

The six girls and their chiefs sing as they focus on the day’s tasks. For the girls, the melody they have found in the woods is a stark contrast to the discord and pain they knew in their lives before coming to Camp Duncan, Baptist Children’s Homes’ (BCH) therapeutic camp program for girls. “I had become self-destructive,” 15-year-old Jessie remembers. “I had closed off the world pushing everyone that loved me away.”

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